Category: Literature

Thomas Wolfe Memorial – Asheville, North Carolina

Thomas Wolfe Memorial

Thomas Wolfe, an Asheville native, reached international fame after his first full length novel, Look Homeward, Angel, was published in 1929.  There are many incidents in the book that reference his mother’s boardinghouse that was known around town as “Old Kentucky Home”.  In the book, he referred to it as “Dixieland”.  The Victorian home was constructed in 1883.

Wolfe’s vivid references to Asheville and his “Old Kentucky Home” led to Look Homeward, Angel being banned from public libraries in Asheville for seven years. Time heals all wounds and Wolfe is now honored as one of the city’s most famous sons and the “Old Kentucky Home” is a well preserved memorial and museum that honors one of the giants of 20th century literature.  Asheville is a lovely city with such a diverse history. If you’re ever passing through I highly encourage you to make the time to visit the “Old Kentucky Home” and take a tour.

Anytime I visit Asheville I stop by my favorite local coffee shop, Izzy’s Coffee Den, and I grab a coffee to go. Then, I head over to Tom’s place at 48 Spruce Street to pay my respects and sit in a rocking chair on the front porch and have a cup of coffee. If you ever come here, I recommend you do this after the tourist center closes and it’s quiet and peaceful. And if you’re looking for some great books to add to your reading list, add one of Wolfe’s four novels to your list:

624 Pirate’s Alley – New Orleans

Faulkner House Books

                                                         

Any visit to New Orleans involves exploration and surprises. The city is full of life and surprising treasures like this townhouse.  You’ll find it at 624 Pirates Alley. It was once the home of a young writer from Mississippi named William Faulkner. He lived here for six months in 1925, and that was enough time to launch his literary career. While here, he wrote for the Times-Picayune;  some poetry; and the draft of his first novel, Soldier’s Pay.

The townhouse now serves as a bookstore and literary shrine called Faulkner House Books. When you walk in you’ll be surprised by what you’ll find in such a tiny space. The 16′ ceilings are packed with books! It’s a must visit the next time you’re exploring New Orleans.